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Wednesday 10:51 CST, August 16, 2017

FAQs

General Questions- Submit a Question

Why did The Joint Commission decide to create the Center?

What is the Joint Commission Center for Transforming Healthcare?

How will the Center address shortfalls in quality and safety?

Why is the Center using Robust Process Improvement ® (RPI) to improve health care?


Targeted Solutions Tool ®- Submit a Question

Contact Information

Using the TST®

Technical Requirements


Project Selection- Submit a Question

What are some of the other Center projects?

Why was hand hygiene the first problem addressed by the Targeted Solutions Tool®?

Why was wrong site surgery selected as a problem to be addressed by the Targeted Solutions Tool®?


Solution Dissemination- Submit a Question

How will The Joint Commission roll out project solutions to the nation’s healthcare organizations?

Do healthcare organizations need to adopt Lean Six Sigma, hire Black Belts or retain consultants in order to implement the solutions identified by the Center and collaborating organizations?

Will non-Joint Commission accredited healthcare organizations be able to obtain information on the solutions developed by the Center and collaborating organizations?


Structure- Submit a Question

Is there a way for more health care organizations to work with the Center to develop solutions to other pressing health care issues?

How were the original collaborating organizations selected?

Can health care organizations other than hospitals participate in Center projects?


Robust Process Improvement ®- Submit a Question

What are some of the common terms (and definitions) associated with Robust Process Improvement® activities such as those utilized by the collaborating hospitals?


Hand Hygiene TST ®- Submit a Question

Hand Hygiene Project and the TST®


Safe Surgery TST ®- Submit a Question

Safe Surgery and the TST®


Hand-off Communications TST ®- Submit a Question

Hand-off Communications and TST® FAQs


General Questions

Q: Why did The Joint Commission decide to create the Center?
A:
Historically, The Joint Commission has led the way nationally and internationally to identify the highest priority health care quality and safety problems and to address them. With National Patient Safety Goals, core measures, and state-of-the-art accreditation standards, health care organizations know where they should be focusing their efforts to gain the greatest improvements in safety and quality. Many already devote sizable resources to this end. Yet, major shortfalls in quality and safety persist.
 
 
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Q: What is the Joint Commission Center for Transforming Healthcare?
A:

Created in 2008, the Joint Commission Center for Transforming Healthcare aims to solve health care’s most critical safety and quality problems. The Center’s participants – some of the nation’s leading hospitals and other health care organizations – use a systematic approach to analyze specific breakdowns in care and discover their underlying causes to develop targeted solutions that solve these complex problems. In keeping with its objective to transform health care into a high reliability industry, The Joint Commission shares these proven effective solutions with the more than 20,000 health care organizations it accredits and certifies. The Center for Transforming healthcare is a 501(c)3 not for profit affiliate of The Joint Commission.

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Q: How will the Center address shortfalls in quality and safety?
A:

The Joint Commission Center for Transforming Healthcare addresses critical safety and quality problems, such as hand hygiene, wrong site surgery, and hand-off communications. Although there is considerable agreement on the importance of these problems and on some strategies to address them, there is an even stronger demand for specific guidance on how to solve them. Health care organizations want highly effective, durable solutions that are ready to implement. The Center for Transforming Healthcare presents a new approach to achieve the magnitude and breadth of improvement that is sought by The Joint Commission, by health care organizations, by patients and their families, by physicians and other clinicians, and by other public and private stakeholders.

The Center is developing solutions through the application of the same Robust Process Improvement ® (RPI) methods and tools that other industries have long relied on to improve quality, safety and efficiency. Using these methods and tools, the Center identifies the most pressing safety problems, measures their impact, discovers their causes, develops specific solutions that are targeted to each important cause, and thoroughly tests the solutions in real-life situations. By testing, validating the results, and communicating the most effective solutions, the Center provides health care organizations with valuable knowledge, tested tools and better strategies to deliver safe, quality care.

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Q: Why is the Center using Robust Process Improvement ® (RPI) to improve health care?
A:

One of the important advantages of using process improvement tools such as DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, control) is that they provide a systematic approach to solving complex problems. Specifically, they guide improvement teams to examine why processes fail to achieve their desired results. It is this systematic search for causes of quality and safety problems and the assessment of the relative contribution of each cause that gives these improvement tools a great deal of their effectiveness. Experience with the application of the tools of Robust Process Improvement® in health care is consistent with that of other industries including aerospace, automotive, construction, electronics and more.

The collaborating organizations in the Center’s network have a great deal of experience using RPI® methods and tools, such as Lean Six Sigma and change management, in the health care environment. Currently, the lack of convincing data is a key weakness in the effort to improve safety and quality. Because Lean Six Sigma projects are driven by highly reliable measurements, they provide an ideal source of data on the ultimate impact of the solutions.  
 

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Targeted Solutions Tool ®

Contact Information

Q:  Who do I contact with any questions about the TST®?

A:  Call Joint Commission Customer Service at (630) 792-5800 or send an e-mail to tst_support@tcthc.org with your name, organization name and organization location. Center staff will respond to your e-mail within two business days.

 

 

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Using the TST®

Q: How do I get access to the Targeted Solutions Tool®?

A. The process to gain access to a Center TST® tool is:

  • Staff at a Joint Commission accredited organization that do not have an Extranet log-in can request access from the Center website using  the ”Request Access” button on the TST® page: http://www.centerfortransforminghealthcare.org/tst.aspx
  • A TST® registration page will be displayed.  Staff will select their organization, enter demographic and email address information, and submit their TST access request.
  • The email address on the TST® access request will be validated against the email domains on file for their organization.  
  • For TST® access requests with email domains on file for the organization, the requestor will be given a login and password.  This login and password will only allow access to the TST® tool. 
  • The TST® login and password will be emailed to the requester.  The requestor will be prompted to update their password when they first login.  This step confirms the TST® requestor is using a valid, active email address.

Or:

If staff members already have access to the TST® and would like to request access to one of their organization’s projects, they can find their desired project within the TST® and click on “Request Access”. The project leader will receive an email advising of the request to join the project.
 

Q: Will information that I enter into the Target Solutions Tool® be made public?

A: No. Organization specific information will not be made public. It is confidential and is for your organization’s use only. It will not be used in the accreditation process. Aggregated de-identified compliance information may be made available.

 

Q: Will using or not using the Targeted Solutions Tool® affect my Joint Commission accreditation?

A: No. Any information entered into the TST® is kept confidential and will not be used in the accreditation process. An accreditation surveyor would have no way of knowing that an organization is using the TST® unless the organization shares this voluntarily. However, if an organization chooses to use their TST® work as part of their annual proactive risk assessment, then proof of use will be necessary.

 

 


 

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Technical Requirements

Q:  What software does my computer need to use the Targeted Solutions Tool®?

A:  The TST® works best with the following applications and settings. You may want to consult with your company’s technical support before making changes to your PC or if you are unsure about your current settings.

Preferred browser Internet Explorer 9.0 or above 
If you have earlier versions of IE, some features may not work.
Windows requirements Windows 2003 or above (XP, Vista, Windows 7)
Microsoft Office 2003 or above (for some downloads)
High speed Internet connection is preferred
Needed plug-ins Adobe Reader 8 or above
Adobe Flash Player
Windows Media Player
Without these, you may not have access to videos or PDFs.
Supported tablets iPad
Screen resolution Minimum setting of 1024 x 768 pixels
1. Go to the Start Menu in the lower left corner of your screen
2. Scroll up to Settings
3. Select the Control Panel option
4. Double click on the Display icon
5. Click on the Settings tab
6. In the box titled Desktop Area, move the slider to 1024 x 768 or higher
Avoid inactivity timeout Save every 20 minutes
Allow pop-ups Some applications require “pop-up” windows:
1. Click on the Tools menu
2. Click on Pop-up Blocker Settings. If this isn’t listed, you have a third-party pop-up blocker (see below).
3. Type in http://www.jointcommissionconnect.org and click Add
Third-party pop-up blockers can prevent you from getting pop-up windows. The most common are Google Toolbar, Yahoo! Toolbar, MSN Search Toolbar, and Norton Internet Security. Determine what pop-up blocker you are using, find its list of allowed sites, and add http://www.jointcommissionconnect.org.

 


Q:  How do I correct errors on screen displays in the Targeted Solutions Tool®?

A:  Older Internet browsers may not display TST® windows properly. Determine if your computer browser is Internet Explorer 7 or above; if it is not, contact your organization’s IT department for a browser upgrade.
 

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Project Selection

Q: What are some of the other Center projects?
A:

Hand-off communications, surgical site infections, preventing avoidable heart failure hospitalizations, safety culture, and preventing falls with injury are the other projects that the Center is working on. These projects were selected based on current concerns and the collaborating hospitals’ and health systems’ choices.
 

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Q: Why was hand hygiene the first problem addressed by the Targeted Solutions Tool®?
A:

There is a direct link between hand hygiene and health care-associated infections. According to the World Health Organization, hand hygiene is the primary way to reduce health care-associated infections. Nearly 100,000 deaths occur each year in America’s hospitals due to health care-associated infections. Although the action of hand hygiene is simple, compliance among health care workers is variable throughout the world. Thus, improving compliance can greatly improve the safety and quality of care. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, studies have found that hand hygiene – the most basic, low cost, and low technology infection prevention and control strategy – is ignored by half of health care workers.
 

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Q: Why was wrong site surgery selected as a problem to be addressed by the Targeted Solutions Tool®?
A:

Some estimates put the national incidence rate, which includes wrong patient, wrong procedure, wrong site and wrong side surgeries as high as 40 times per week. It is also the most frequent sentinel event reported through The Joint Commission sentinel event reporting process. While wrong site surgery events are rare, they can be life altering for the patients who sustain them.   
 

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Solution Dissemination

Q: How will The Joint Commission roll out project solutions to the nation’s healthcare organizations?
A:

Detailed information about the root causes and identified solutions are available on the Center’s website. Also, in September 2010, the Joint Commission Center for Transforming Healthcare introduced its Targeted Solutions Tool® (TST®), an innovative application that all Joint Commission accredited health care organizations can access through the Joint Commission Connect extranet site. The TST® guides health care organizations through a step-by-step process to accurately measure their organization’s actual performance, identify their barriers to excellent performance, and direct them to proven solutions that are customized to address their particular barriers. The TST® currently provides targeted solutions for hand hygiene and wrong site surgery. Targeted solutions for hand-off communications, surgical site infections, heart failure hospitalizations, safety culture, falls, and others will be incorporated into the TST® as the Center completes these projects. 
 

 

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Q: Do healthcare organizations need to adopt Lean Six Sigma, hire Black Belts or retain consultants in order to implement the solutions identified by the Center and collaborating organizations?
A:

No. The Joint Commission’s Robust Process Improvement® toolkit includes a variety of methodologies. While The Joint Commission supports the use of highly effective process improvement methodologies in health care, it does not require the use of a specific methodology. The goal of translating the Center’s work is to make the solutions free of jargon and easy to use by clinicians and quality professionals already employed or on staff at health care organizations.

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Q: Will non-Joint Commission accredited healthcare organizations be able to obtain information on the solutions developed by the Center and collaborating organizations?
A:

Anyone can access the root causes and identified solutions, which are posted on the Center’s website. However, only Joint Commission accredited organizations have access to the Targeted Solutions Tool®
 

 

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Structure

Q: Is there a way for more health care organizations to work with the Center to develop solutions to other pressing health care issues?
A:

Interested health care organizations should contact John Cullinan, director, E-Health Information Products, at jcullinan@jointcommission.org or (630) 792-5822.
 
 

 

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Q: How were the original collaborating organizations selected?
A:

The original collaborating hospitals and health care systems are known for their experience in using Robust Process Improvement® tools successfully in applying systematic problem-solving to clinical quality and safety issues. They also devoted the resources necessary to support the project work in their organizations and to collaborate with their peers. A number of these systems include small and medium-sized hospitals, in both urban and rural settings (e.g., Intermountain, Trinity Health and Mayo Clinic). More small, rural and mid-sized hospitals are engaged in piloting the solutions as they become ready for dissemination. 

 

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Q: Can health care organizations other than hospitals participate in Center projects?
A:

While the early Center projects focused on safety issues in hospitals, most of the solutions can be applied across all health care settings. The Center’s participants have substantial, real-life expertise using RPI® in the health care environment. They are using a proven systematic approach to analyze specific breakdowns in care, discover their underlying causes, and develop targeted solutions that solve these complex problems. Because RPI ®expertise in health care today is concentrated in hospitals and health systems, the Center began its work by collaborating with a group of hospitals and health systems that had expertise in these methods. The Center is now including other types of health care organizations as RPI® expertise spreads, as new projects are tackled, and as additional funds become available. Meanwhile, this website allows organizations to have easy access to Center projects and solutions.

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Robust Process Improvement ®

Q: What are some of the common terms (and definitions) associated with Robust Process Improvement® activities such as those utilized by the collaborating hospitals?
A:

Robust Process Improvement ® (RPI®)  is The Joint Commission’s fact-based, systematic and data-driven problem-solving methodology for improving its business processes that continuously increases their efficiency and the quality of its products and services.

Six Sigma: A business philosophy of focusing on continuous improvement by understanding customers’ needs, analyzing business processes, and instituting proper measurement methods.

Lean: A well-defined set of tools that increase customer value by eliminating waste and creating flow throughout the value stream.
  
DMAIC: Basic Six Sigma methodology used by organizations. DMAIC stands for define, measure, analyze, improve and control. This method is used to improve the current capabilities of an existing process. 

Critical to Quality (CTQ): A feature by which customers evaluate the quality of a product or service.

Change Management Process: A set of actions, supported by a tool set, used to prepare an organization to seek, commit to, and accept change.

Defect: Any unit or event that does not meet customer requirements. A defect must be measurable.

Work Out: A structured, systematic way to bring people together to develop rapid, lasting improvements in process performance. The improvements are typically implemented in 90 to 120 days.
 

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Hand Hygiene TST ®

Hand Hygiene Project and the TST®

Q:  Why should I use the Targeted Solutions Tool® hand hygiene application?

A:  TST® provides the foundation and framework for an improvement method that, if implemented well, will improve an organization’s hand hygiene compliance and contribute substantially to its efforts in reducing the frequency of health care-associated infections. Together, the leading hospitals and health care systems that developed the hand hygiene solutions have achieved and continue to show major and sustained gains in hand hygiene. At the start of the project in April 2009, they were surprised to learn that their rate of hand hygiene compliance averaged 48 percent. By June 2010 they had reached an average rate of 82 percent that had been sustained for eight months. Many other hospitals across the country – small, medium and large – collaborated with the Center to test the work of the original eight hospitals and provide guidance on the development of the TST® for Hand Hygiene. These hospitals experienced the same gains as the original eight.
 

Q:  How long will a hand hygiene project take to complete?

A:  The duration of a hand hygiene project varies from organization to organization. Hand hygiene projects have generally lasted from six to 12 weeks depending on the resources and experience of the organization.

 

Q:  How many staff members should be on a hand hygiene project team?

A:  A core team of three to seven people is recommended. 

Q: How much staff time and commitment will a hand hygiene project require?

A:  You will need to obtain management support for your project and assemble a project team. Project teams can be expected to spend up to four hours a week collecting and entering compliance data, attending team meetings, and implementing solutions during the first 12 weeks of the project. You can expect to spend four hours each month to sustain the gains achieved by the hand hygiene improvement strategies.
 

Q:  What type of staff should be on a hand hygiene project team?

A:  The hand hygiene team should include a strong physician champion and a project leader to facilitate meetings and help gain buy-in from stakeholders. Include the manager of the pilot unit and people who work in the area, including ancillary staff, when appropriate (for example, housekeeping, lab, respiratory therapy). It is important to identify and consider the project stakeholders.

Q:  Why is hand hygiene defined as “wash in/wash out?”

A:  Observation was chosen as the method to determine baseline and post-solution hand hygiene compliance rates. However, it is nearly impossible to accurately observe hand hygiene compliance when washing occurs in a patient’s room. The Center decided to adopt the philosophy of “wash in/wash out” which directs health care personnel to wash their hands upon entry and exit from a patient’s room. This allows for accurate measurement, while still promoting the philosophy of washing before and after patient contact.

Q:  Both WHO and CDC guidelines address hand hygiene when a health care worker touches a patient or the environment and this is what our policy reflects. How do we reconcile this with "wash in, wash out?"

A:  The concept of “wash in and wash out,” which is part of the approach and the solutions described in the Targeted Solutions Tool®, describes a minimum number of times a health care worker should conduct hand hygiene when entering and exiting a patient’s room. If patient care necessitates the additional washing of hands (more than that required with “wash in, wash out”) this should be done in accordance with WHO or CDC hand hygiene guidelines.

Q:  What is a project charter?

A:  A project charter puts in writing the scope, team members, goals and completion dates of the hand hygiene pilot project. The project charter is signed by the project team members as a demonstration of their support for the project and their agreement on the project’s goals and scope.

Q: CDC and WHO guidelines indicate that health care personnel should wash their hands before and after patient contact. Why did the Center and participating hospitals decide to measure compliance upon entry to and exit from a patient’s room?

A: The collaborating organizations chose observation as the method to determine baseline and post-solution compliance rates. However, it is nearly impossible to accurately observe hand hygiene compliance when washing occurs in a patient’s room. The organizations decided to uniformly adopt the philosophy of “wash in – wash out,” whereby health care personnel are directed to wash their hands upon entry and exit from a patient’s room. This allows for accurate measurement, while still promoting the philosophy of washing before and after patient contact.

Q: Did the collaborating organizations measure and seek to improve the hand washing compliance of patients and visitors?

A: The Center’s project excluded measuring compliance of patients and visitors. CDC and WHO guidelines are directed toward health care personnel (HCP) only. The CDC definition of HCP excludes patients, family members and other visitors, but does include students, volunteers and other health care workers with direct patient contact. Studies have shown a greater risk of disease transmission from health care personnel compared to non-health care personnel such as patients and family members.

Q: Did the organizations attempt to reduce infections related to the use of medical equipment such as stethoscopes or clothing (e.g., lab coats and ties)?

A: The scope of this Center project did not include assessing the adequacy of procedures for disinfecting medical equipment or evaluating the impact of clothing of caregivers on transmissibility of infection. There are multiple factors that contribute to the effectiveness of infection prevention and control programs. Improving other aspects of infection prevention and control will be the focus of future Center projects.

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Safe Surgery TST ®

Safe Surgery and the TST®

Q: Why should I use the Targeted Solutions Tool® Safe Surgery application?

A: The TST® for Safe Surgery was created to help organizations identify, mesure, and reduce risks in key processes that can contribute to a wrong site surgery. These risks can be evaluated across the organization’s surgical system, including scheduling, pre-operative and operating room areas. Since the occurrence of wrong site surgery is rare, with most organizations going years without an occurrence, it could take a long time to monitor the incidence of wrong site surgery for a project. However, it is possible to monitor surgical cases for weaknesses that might result in a wrong site surgery, and that is exactly what the TST® for Safe Surgery does.

Q: How long will a Safe Surgery Project take to complete?

A: The duration of a Safe Surgury Project varies from organization to organization and generally lasts from 14 to 16 weeks, depending on the resources and experience of the organization. An organization can begin to see improvements in as little as eight weeks.

Q: How many staff members should be on a Safe Surgery Project team?

A: On average, the project team should consist of five to seven members.

 

Q: What type of staff should be on a Safe Surgery Project team?

A: The Safe Surgery Project team should include a strong physician champion and a project leader to facilitate meetings and help gain buy-in from stakeholders. Include the operating room manager and people who work in the OR scheduling, pre-op and OR areas. It is important to identify and consider the project stakeholders.

Q: How much staff time and commitment will a Safe Surgery Project require?

A: You will need to obtain management support for your project and assemble a project team. Project teams can be expected to spend up to four hours a week collecting compliance data in the first 12 weeks of the project. You can expect to spend four hours each month to sustain the gains achieved by the Safe Surgery improvement strategies.

Q: What is a project charter?

A: A project charter puts in writing the scope, team members, goals and completion dates of the Safe Surgery Project. The project charter is signed by the project team members as a demonstration of their support for the project and their agreement on the project’s goals and scope.

Q: Can I get a copy of the Safe Surgery Targeted Solutions Tool®?

A: No. The TST® is not a checklist or bundle, it is a web-based application that uses a six step process to help organizations measure their performance in the areas of surgical booking, pre-op/holding, and the operating room.  This data is analyzed by the tool in a presentation-ready format which then leads the organization to solutions targeted to impact these risks. 

Q: Can an organization use the Safe Surgery Targeted Solutions Tool® in procedural areas?

A: Yes, it is recommended that you use the tool in the surgical areas first and then do a follow-up project in procedural areas to build on what you’ve learned, but the tool is suited to procedural areas as well.

Q: Does the Safe Surgery Targeted Solutions Tool® include solutions for regional blocks performed by anesthesia?

A: Yes, the pre-op/holding materials include an option to audit and improve the Time Out process for these procedures performed outside the operating room.

Q: Our organization is using a safe surgery checklist, can we use the Safe Surgery Targeted Solutions Tool®?

A: Yes, the Safe Surgery Targeted Solutions Tool® can be used to help you assess how well the checklist is being followed. It can also provide data that could be used towards building a checklist.  For instance, if the Time Out process is being initiated by the circulating nurse 99 percent of the time, then why would you want to implement a checklist where the physician initiates the Time Out?

Q: Is there any cost to use the Safe Surgery Targeted Solutions Tool®?

A: No, the Safe Surgery Targeted Solutions Tool® is provided at no additional charge to Joint Commission accredited organizations.

Q: I work in an ambulatory surgical center; can I use the Safe Surgery Targeted Solutions Tool®?

A: Yes, the Safe Surgery Targeted Solutions Tool® was tested both in hospital and ambulatory surgery centers of various sizes. The solutions contained within the tool are tailored to both settings.

Q: When will the data we’ve collected be available to present to our team?

A: The Safe Surgery Targeted Solutions Tool® will automatically generate your data analysis after you have input the minimum number of observations, which is 100 for both the baseline and improve phases. This analysis is provided in a PowerPoint format complete with illustrative graphs and descriptions. An advanced analysis feature generates additional custom charts based on your data.

Q: Our organization has never had a wrong site surgery. Staff are questioning the need to do a Safe Surgery project with the Targeted Solutions Tool® – what can I say to persuade them?

A: Many of the pilot organizations had also never had a wrong site surgery event. Like many organizations, they had established policies regarding surgical processes. But during the project it was discovered that what leadership thought was happening (i.e., following policies) and what was really happening were very different. They were pleased to find areas where they could improve and a tool that allowed them to measure success and monitor progress going forward. The Safe Surgery Targeted Solutions Tool® can be used to validate that your processes are consistent and effective in eliminating the risks that could lead to a wrong site surgery.

 

 

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Hand-off Communications TST ®

Hand-off Communications and TST® FAQs

Q: Why should I use the Targeted Solutions Tool® (TST®) for Hand-off Communications?

A: Ineffective hand-off communication is recognized as a critical patient safety problem in health care. When a patient moves from one care setting to another, poor communication can result in patient harm, increased costs, and patient dissatisfaction. In order to address these problems, The Center for Transforming Healthcare developed the Hand-off Communications Targeted Solutions Tool® (TST®), a customized tool that measures the effectiveness of hand-offs within your organization or to another facility, and provides proven solutions.
 

Q. How does the TST® for Hand-off Communications work?

A: The Hand-off Communications TST® will guide your organization through the entire improvement process from building a team, measuring the current baseline, identifying specific causes, and linking those causes to proven solutions.
 

Q: How long will a hand-off communications project take to see results?

A: In just 16 to 21 weeks after starting your project, you will begin to see the results of your work.
 

Q. How many staff members should be in a hand-off communications project team?

A: On average, the project team should consist of four to seven members.

Q: What type of staff should be on a hand-off communications project team?

A: The team should include a strong sponsor (senior leadership is recommended for this role), physician champion, nursing champion and project leader. The project leader will facilitate meetings and help gain buy-in from stakeholders. We recommend that the project leader has operational understanding of the project's areas. The team should also include senders and receivers from the settings chosen for this project.

Q: How much staff time and commitment will a hand-off communications project require?

A: You will need to obtain management support for your project and assemble a project team. Project teams can be expected to spend up to four hours a week collecting defect rate data for the project. You can expect to spend four hours each month to sustain the gains achieved by the hand-off communications improvement strategies.

Q: What is a project charter?

A: A project charter puts in writing the scope, team members, goals and completion dates of the hand-off communications project. The project charter is signed by the project team members as a demonstration of their support for the project and their agreement on the project’s goals and scope.

Q: Who collects the data for the hand-off communications project?

A: A hand-off process involves “senders,” the caregivers transmitting patient information and transitioning care of a patient to the next clinician, and “receivers,” the caregivers who accept the patient information and care of the patient. Senders and receivers will be trained on key contributing factors of an effective hand-off. Both senders and receivers will collect data on whether the hand-off met their needs to care for a patient (defect rate), and if not, what contributing factors caused the failure. Data collected by senders and receivers are used to calculate the defect rate for hand-offs as well as to identify the main contributing factors to failed hand-offs.

Q: I work in a home care setting; can I use the Hand-off Communications Targeted Solutions Tool®?

A: Yes, the Hand-off Communications Targeted Solutions Tool® is flexible enough to use in any setting and for any type of transition of care – both internal and external. One of its key features is the ability to customize for your specific setting.

Q: Is there any cost to use the Hand-off Communications Targeted Solutions Tool®?

A: No, the Hand-off Communications Targeted Solutions Tool® is provided at no additional charge to Joint Commission accredited organizations.

Q: When will the data we’ve collected be available to present to our team?

A: The Hand-off Communications TST® will automatically generate your data analysis after you have input the observations. It will provide real time analysis as more data is added.

Q: What is the minimum data requirement for the baseline measurement period?

A: There is an option to collect data daily or weekly. The selection of daily or weekly will determine how your graphs are displayed. For weekly data collection, the pilot areas should have at least 70 hand-off observations in a six week period, distributed evenly over the six week period. With both senders and receivers collecting data, this would total a minimum of 140 data collection forms (70 each). If the pilot area(s) do not have at least 70 hand-offs in a six week period, then collect 100 percent for six weeks. For daily data collection, there must be at least five hand-offs per day and data must be collected daily for 14 days (two weeks) in order to ensure representative data. With both senders and receivers collecting data, this would total a minimum of 140 data collection forms (70 each).   

 

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